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Perth Stadium – Kicking Goals with LCA

As part of an overall environmental strategy stipulated by the State Government, LCA has been integrated into the design and construction of Perth Stadium.  eTool produced life cycle assessment analysis in three stages forming part of the overall design strategy as outlined below.

 

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Process

Stage 1: An initial “Targeting Study” was completed during bid stages whereby two initial models were developed – an initial LCA model of Perth Stadium and a benchmark LCA model of the already constructed Etihad Stadium (Melbourne) which was considered a typical stadium build.  From the outset, Perth Stadium was indicating an improvement over the benchmark due to the predominantly steel structure which is inherently lower in CO2e emissions compared to concrete structures.  The targeting study also highlighted a number of CO2e hotspots such as food and drinks refrigerators which are typically left on between games.  Controls to switch off non-perishable items between events were an obvious easy win and one which the design team was confident in being able to implement.

Stage 2: As the design progressed, further information became available and the models accuracy was increased and consolidated with bills of quantities.  With steel and concrete contributing the majority of the embodied impacts, it was important that these elements were accurate.  The refrigerant gasses for chillers and food refrigerators was also included which contributed over 2% towards the total CO2e impacts, with the Stadium seating also found to have very high recurring impacts.  Strategies put forward included using a low impact refrigerant such as CO2 and specifying extended warranties for the seating in order to increase the duration of their useful life (hence lowering their impact).

Stage 3:  The model was finalised to include all recommendations uptaken as well as final quantities for materials and energy modelling figures.  The design team were able to implement the following:

Strategies to switch-off non perishable item fridges between events

Blast Furnace Slag replacement in some structural concrete elements

Extended Seat Warranty effectively prolonging the predicted lifespan of the seats

The State LCA requirements were as follows.

– a 7% reduction against the benchmark in product stages (A1-A5)

– a 5% reduction in Maintenance stages (B2-B5)

– a 20% reduction in Operational stages (B6-B7)

Results

The LCA analysis was able to successfully show performance against these impacts and quickly develop effective strategies to meet the targets.  The final design specification shows overall life cycle impacts of 7.68 tCO2e/seat/year; which when split across the planned 37 events per year results in impacts of 0.2 tCO2e/visit.  This exceeds the targets with a

– a 9.1% reduction in product stages (A1-A5)

– a 8.1% reduction in Maintenance stages (B2-B5)

– a 32.2% reduction in Operational stages (B6-B7)

The study also highlights the importance of taking a Life Cycle approach towards targets.  When targets are set for individual elements perverse outcomes can occur.  For example, PV panels are very effective in reducing life cycle emissions in Western Australia, however in this instance they would negatively affect the maintenance target (due to the replacement of the panels).  eTool recommends that a single whole of life approach is taken to ensure absolute environmental benefit is achieved.

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Why Love LCD? – Henrique Mendonca

We love Life Cycle Design (LCD), which is why we’ve made it the core of our business.

Earlier this year we launched our ‘Love LCD’ campaign where we ask each member of the team at eTool why they love LCD. There are lots of reasons to love it, and we hope that we can show you just how great it is.

Why Love LCD?

Reason #1: As a result of global collaboration we have an international standard for quantifying environmental performance of our buildings.

Watch Henrique Mendonca talk about why he loves LCD:

Tell us what you love about Life Cycle Design. Share it with us!

LCD fact of the month

eTool FACT Of The Month – December 2015

The LCD fact of the month is related to how much carbon emissions is associated with household water use and treatment. The ratio varies between cities in Australia and globally.

How much CO2e is associated with water?

LCD fact of the month

Perth has been served with traditional water sources from shallow groundwater and dams, and since 2006, Perth became the first Australian city to operate a reverse osmosis seawater desalination plant, the Kwinana Desalination Plant, where the water from the ocean flows through the membranes to extract all of the salt. Pumping required for desalination and distribution is very energy intensive so by the time you use the water there is a lot of embodied carbon in it, as outlined in the fact above. The water treatment process also requires additional energy for pumping and filtration further increasing the amount of embodied carbon per kL of water. Energy sources used in water supply and treatment include electricity from coal and gas, and renewables. Increased efficiencies with less water use, higher use of recycled water and use of renewable energy are all part of the plan to provide sufficient water sustainably.

 

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